Finding Places to Rent an Apartment in Chicago With Bad Credit, a Broken Lease Or a Criminal Felony

Chicago is the third largest metropolitan in the United States and as such attracts thousands of people each day. The city is also a formidable financial center making it a magnet for people seeking economic and career opportunities. Chicago has many different apartments which are excellent for any purpose and for any family size. If you are shopping for an apartment rental in Chicago, it is best to be armed with the necessary information required. One of these is to know your credit score because Chicago apartments will conduct credit and rental history checks not to mention criminal background checks as well. So where can one rent an apartment in Chicago if they have a prior broken lease, less-than-adequate credit or a criminal record?

There are many different localities within Chi-town where this is possible. The following areas have different apartment leasing homes that cater to applicants with an unflattering rental history, tainted credit or criminal past:

  • Downtown Chicago
  • Southside
  • Center City
  • Southwest
  • Bridesburg

One challenge that many people who have a poor rental background or less-than-perfect credit is where to locate apartments that are willing to work with them. This is because many second-chance apartments in Chicago do not advertise that they work with people with imperfect credit. This leaves applicants to guess which can be a costly and frustrating exercise indeed.

Techniques of find bad credit apartments in Chicago

One way to find second chance apartments in Chicago is off course the Internet. This can also be tricky because not all websites are straightforward and apartments rental regulations are constantly being revised.

Another option is to contract an apartment locator. Usually if you tell them what the issue is they can look for an apartment for you which can cater for people with previous issues such as broken lease agreements, bad credit or criminal pasts.

Important information to bear in mind

It is essential that you understand that even if the apartments are willing to work with impaired credit and/or an imperfect record as far as renting, they will still request that you fulfill a few requirements:

  • Have a job for at least six months prior
  • Be earning at least 3 times the rental amount
  • Not be convicted of violent crime or crime against minors
  • If felony, it has to be at least 5 years old

Sometimes the apartments will also require a hefty deposit and may hike their rent. But again these requirements vary from apartment to apartment and locality to locality.

Are you looking for apartments in Chicago which will approve you despite a previous broken apartment lease agreement, sub-prime credit or a criminal record?

5 Smart Tips on Leasing Your Next Car

Consumers shopping for a new car have three options for making a deal. The first option involves a cash payment with no financing involved. The second option is automotive financing, where the consumer puts money down on a new car and finances the rest. The third option is to lease a car, basically renting it for a term and then returning it at the end of the lease.

Few people can afford to pay cash for a car, leaving the other two options as possibilities. While financing can help you to eventually own your car, leasing can help you get a new car every few years and avoid the hassle and expense of major repairs down the line.

Let’s take a look at several smart tips on leasing your next car:

1. Consider your purchase. What type of new vehicle do you want? When leasing, you need to identify the vehicle that is right for you including the make/model, trim level and other amenities. Choose the car you want and outfit it the way you want before moving to the next step. Yes, you should test drive your vehicle too to make sure that it is the right car for you.

2. Select a term. How long do you want to lease your next car? Although it is possible to get out from underneath a lease, you’ll pay transfer costs to a new owner, that is if you can find one. Choose a lease term that suits you, opting for a shorter 24-month lease if you expect your transportation needs will change or a 36-month or longer lease if you expect your needs will remain the same. The longer the lease, the lower the monthly payment… usually.

3. Know your mileage limits. Leasees often get hammered at the end of the lease term because they did not know their mileage and other limitations. Typically, you’ll be able to drive 1,000 miles per month or 39,000 miles for a 39-month lease. Go over that number and you could be charged 20 cents per mile, a payment you’ll need to make at the end of the lease term.

4. Consider wear and tear. When leasing, you need to take care of the usual maintenance unless a maintenance program is included with your lease. Change the oil at regular intervals, rotate tires, replace the air filter and handle other end of lease term matters. If you return the vehicle with obvious signs of wear and tear, expect to accessed a fee for maintenance. You may end up holding a bill for hundreds of dollars in repairs, maintenance and touch ups inside and out.

5. When to buy. Some people contend that there are better times to lease a car than others. Typically, that time can appear during the last four months of the calendar year as manufacturers seek to move older product off of dealer lots to free up space for new models. Still, lease deals can be had throughout the year, therefore keep your eyes peeled for bargains. Also, you can negotiate your lease too, reducing your monthly payment and your down payment or your capitalized cost rate.

Final Thoughts

When leasing a car, you’ll typically lease through the manufacturer’s financing arm. Negotiate the best deal and if you later decide you don’t want the car, there are services such as Swapalease.com and LeaseTrader.com that can help you get out from underneath a lease. You can also use those services to test leasing, taking over lease payments yourself to find out if a particular car and leasing is right for you.

Renting An Apartment In A Big City – Advantages and Disadvantages

The prospect of renting an apartment in the city can be both exciting and a little intimidating. If it is something that you are considering, it is important that you take the time to carefully consider your options before you commit to anything in writing.

There are a number of advantages and disadvantages associated with making this sort of move, so here we will take a look at some of each so that you can make your decision armed with a little bit of extra information.

Advantages

One of the biggest advantages of renting an apartment in the big city is that it is generally a lot cheaper than trying to buy a house, particularly if you are moving for the first time in an effort to be closer to work or to simply strike out on your own. The prices of housing in any major city will be inflated to reflect the popularity of the area, so renting an apartment is often the most cost-effective solution.

Furthermore, you will be able to reduce your costs further by looking for a place that has a number of amenities in place. This will usually mean seeking out a decent apartment complex, but if the building has washing machines and other features, you can cut down on the smaller costs in life quite considerably.

This also goes for maintenance, as owning a house means taking responsibility for everything that is inside the house. If the boiler breaks down or a lock breaks, you will be responsible for replacing it, which can negatively impact your budget. When living in the city, this can be a major problem and it is one that is remedied if you choose to rent an apartment instead.

Disadvantages

You will often have to give up some of your privacy in order to live in an apartment, as you may find that you can hear your neighbours through the walls. You will also encounter them much more often when going to and fro in the building, which may not be ideal for people who value having their own space as much as possible.

It is also rare to find apartments that allow you to keep pets on a general level, and practically impossible in the big city. Pets are usually banned entirely from apartment complexes because of the mess that they are capable of making and the fact that they will often disturb residents. However, if you are not a pet person this can also be an advantage as it means you won’t have to worry about loud barking or other disturbances.

You are also bound by your tenancy agreement when you rent an apartment, which can place restrictions on what you are allowed to do when it comes to decorating. It is extremely important to read any paperwork you are presented with before you sign on the dotted line, as you don’t want to be tied into any agreements that are disadvantageous to you in the long run.

Commercial Property Leasing Activity Report – Your Complete and Foolproof Guide

When you manage or lease a commercial, industrial, or retail building you have to track the leasing issues, not only for the landlord, but also for the tenant. The performance of an investment property is impacted by rental and lease documentation in a variety of ways; you do not normally want a vacant property.

The Property Manager or Leasing Manager for the property has to keep things under control and on track to the property strategy, business plan, and tenancy mix.

To solve the problem it is best to run a leasing activity reporting process and update it at least monthly. Within each month the report becomes a moving tool to support the property investment for the landlord. It is a document that tracks:

  • Current lease activity
  • Forward lease changes
  • Vacancies

What you are normally looking to avoid here with the report is disruption to cash flow or something that disturbs the function of the property outside of any plans you may have. Accuracy in the report is paramount as it is likely to be the main document that keeps you abreast of critical lease issues. If there is an error in the report then you will likely miss a critical date on a lease, and that can be significant in the function of the property over the longer term for the landlord.

The leasing activity report is a forward looking report usually covering the next 12 months and everything that can happen to leases and licences therein. Special attention has to be given to anchor tenants, and tenancy mix strategies that are already in place; these strategies are already active and should be continued.

In a multi-tenant occupancy, the number of leases in the building can become daunting and diverse. When the landlord owns and operates a number of properties at the same time, the matter of lease stability is also complex. The leasing activity report keeps you on track.

A leasing activity report should include the following issues:

  1. A tenancy schedule of current leases including upcoming predicted or known changes such as rent reviews by type and timing, options for a further term, and expiry dates.
  2. Status of any current negotiations with tenants both new and established.
  3. Signed leases report (that is for existing leases for occupying tenants)
  4. Submitted leases report for documents that are outstanding for any reason
  5. Proposals for new leases pending a decision by the landlord or tenant
  6. Vacancy report of areas that are soon to be or are already vacant
  7. Marketing strategy and inspection feedback for vacant areas currently
  8. Prospects currently looking at the property and status
  9. List of vacant areas in competing properties nearby
  10. Changes to tenancy mix recommended
  11. Schedule of rentals in the current surrounding market to which you compete
  12. Overview of the types and level of incentive that exists in the surrounding market
  13. Target rentals and target lease terms
  14. Summary of recent leasing decisions made by the landlord in the last month that impact the property or any vacancy.

When you use these topics for your leasing report, it is clear for you to see that most things are covered and under control. In addition to the items above it is best to provide a time line graph of events both current and foreseen to help track events before they happen.

How To Negotiate A Rent Decrease With Your Landlord During A Recession

Recessions are difficult. A tenant may have accepted a lease arrangement in good faith with the expectation of continued income, but then find circumstances change. Rent that once was easy to pay can suddenly become difficult, or even impossible, to pay. As a result, many renters consider asking for a rent decrease in such trying conditions.

Considering asking for a rent decrease is not the same as asking for or getting a rent decrease. It takes a combination of honesty, planning, courage and desperation to be able to successfully negotiate a rent reduction. If you need to reduce your rent, there are some essential tips on how to approach your landlord with your request.

Landlords often find that it is preferable to grant a rent decrease instead of forcing an existing tenant to move and then to incur the expense of finding a replacement tenant. Tenants who are able to negotiate a rent decrease also are spared the time and expense of looking at other rentals.

While no landlord wants to hear a tenant say that they are unable to pay the rent as previously negotiated, during extended economic recessions, landlords often are willing to be flexible for existing tenants. If you are unable to pay your rent, it is preferable to be upfront with your landlord, so be prepared to approach them as soon as you are aware of your situation.

When meeting with your landlord, explain why your income has dropped. Your employer may have cut your hours down, reduced your wages, or both. Avoid being emotional about the situation; discuss this in a logical manner with your landlord. Experienced landlords will have weathered economic downturns before. The chances are good that they will understand and perhaps even appreciate you coming to them as soon as you are aware of your decreased income.

Particularly during lengthy recessions, it may be useful for you to ask about rental rates for similar units in your area. Providing current rental rate comparisons to your landlord may give you an additional bargaining chip.

If your research shows that other tenants in your area are paying lower rates for similar units, this can be helpful in negotiating a lower rent. Landlords will generally desire to keep some income coming in rather than losing all of the income from your rental unit.

Be sure to negotiate directly with your landlord. If the complex uses a management company, negotiate with the highest ranking person available to you. Have proof available as to the reason your income is reduced and be sure to remind them that you have always paid your rent on time in the past.